Freebie Hunters and Thingamijigs

There seems to be a concerning amount of people running competition offers.

Now, I know we all love a bargain! And I’m a huuuuuuuge fan of a BOGOF or a bulk buy saving, hello Costco!

BUT…

For brands, and services that are just getting started, it’s a worrying trend

(As much as I don’t agree with the methods, I’m not going to criticise how someone chooses to run their business, so let’s for the sake of the post, use Thingamijig as the item in question)

Imagine this exchange:

Customer: I have this fantastic new thingamajig I want to sell, its taken me X amount of time to design it and make it, I’ve spent Y on development and materials and its costs Z

Advisor: Sure, let’s give it away free!

NO! NO! NO! Why would you do this?

There is a temptation that in order to bring it to market, to get people to see it, to use it, and then encourage others to buy it, that a freebie would be a good idea. But here’s the thing, often you will only attract freebie hunters. And many freebie hunters will NEVER go on to buy.

We will have all seen a competition to “win a weekend at Thingami 5 star hotel”, and how many times have you seen the person who enters that competition go “oh well, I didn’t win but let’s go to Thingami 5 star hotel anyway”

Nope, they rarely do. They just enter the next competition, and then the next, and then the next.

Yes, these competitions can drive a level of engagement, but is it the right engagement for your brand? Well, not always. Will these competition winners or bargain hunters turn into repeat customers? Probably not*. Will they recommend to their friends? Possibly, but more than likely they will hold out for your next offer.

And are they engaging fully? Do they know about your brand? Did they read about it or watch your videos? Did they find out how you developed this incredible product? Does it solve a problem or want for them? Do they desire and want it?

Or did they just read the word FREE and hit the like and share?

Hmmm, I think you already know my opinion on that.

There are instances where these tactics can work, but it’s incredibly dependant on the type of thingamajig you are offering and how you are placing yourself on the market.

A good marketer will go through the options with you and work on a long term strategy that can incorporate the best methods for YOUR THINGAMIJIG!

We happen to be rather good marketers so if you want to have a chat about what direction your brand should be taking, get in touch contactus@themarketinggeeks.co.uk

Toodles!

*I say probably not here, but you could be one of the well oiled machines that have the correct methods in place to put your data into a sales funnel and then turn a “probably not” customer into a “oh my goodness YES” customer, in which case, well done! I absolutely salute you!

The Freedom of Saying NO

Yes, there’s a sweary in the image, Totally relevanty!!

When you are just starting out you often look for advice from peers, people you work with or family. And I say this with absolute honesty that when you do this, unless those peers have been in business for themselves for a while and are qualified to be dishing out advice, prepare yourself to hear some of the worst advice you will ever hear.

No joke!

One of the common ones, and my personal favourite is “Never turn down work”

We hear this ALL the time

Now I can see it from both sides; you want work, you want a steady income and you don’t want to disappoint people. But you also need time to work ON your business, make connections and, first and foremost, NOT be strung out by over-committing yourself

So, one of the best skills you can learn is to say NO.

(I’m not saying you should be rude, or run away, or scream, burning bridges is never a good idea)

Saying No, or rather, not immediately saying Yes, is a good habit to get into. It gives you time to step away and figure out whether you want to work with them, if the project or workload is worthwhile, whether you have the time and resources to fulfil the tasks or even just to get some headspace from stressed out clients.

You will get roped into projects or problems because the person who’s problem it is, has projected that problem ON TO you and you want to help. But that’s when its especially important to step away and realise that it’s THEIR problem, not yours.

One of the best tricks I heard about was Robert Kiyosaki (the chap who wrote rich dad, poor dad) who used to tell customers he would need to consult his business partner.

Often even just making a quick phone-call to run through the details of the deal out loud, before deciding.

On the end of the phone would be his business partner, who was in fact, his cat.

But relaying the details out loud were enough to get the clarity on whether it was something he wanted to pursue.

If you don’t have a business partner, or a cat, or perhaps consulting a person isn’t relevant, then just consult your diary. Usually a quick glance at the busy diary is enough to get me back down to earth with a bump, regardless of how much I want to get involved!

On that note,

If it’s something that’s incredibly exciting it can be especially difficult to step away. It can also be a lot harder to leave the project once it begins

So that’s when its SUPER IMPORTANT to take a step away, have a look at the diary, see what time you could commit to it and make an informed decision.

“I’m too busy” IS a valid reason

Often you will hear people saying that being too busy is just an excuse but there is NOTHING WRONG with not wanting to over-commit. You will have existing commitments, projects, work and home life responsibilities. We are all busy people now.

If you find you have extra time when you can help that’s absolutely fine, but don’t be bullied into overstretching yourself.

Being upfront and not being involved is better than resenting the project and not enjoying it because you’ve been a stressed-out ball of anxiety just to bring it to fruition.

Walk away. Decent people will appreciate the honesty.

Anyone who doesn’t is probably someone you have had a lucky escape from.

If you want to find out if working with TMG is a good idea, why don’t we have a chat? You can email us anytime at workwithus@themarketinggeeks.co.uk